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LinkedIn adds ‘creator mode’ its users turn to influence

LinkedIn, a talented social networking siten, invites users to call it the “creator mode,” an arrangement designed to encourage users to post more of their original content, perhaps with a view to influencing, or in a conversational way, think leaders.

One of the hallmarks of the new features, creator mode is changing the presentation of profiles to emphasize the topics users are discussing the most on the platform. Once the creator mode is selected, the user can post hashtags in their interests, which will appear under the title of his or her activity on the profile. In short, the creator mode enhances the “Activity and Input” categories, which highlight posts and links shared by the user, so they are displayed before the bio boxes called “About.”

The creator mode, released this week, will also allow people to “Follow” others using a new setting instead of adding a person to their professional network. The Follow button has always been there, but users should have dug deeper into the settings menu.

Networking on LinkedIn has shifted from focusing on finding new jobs and partnering with other professionals in learning new skills, asking for job guidance and learning industry news, said Keren Baruch, manager of LinkedIn’s creative product development team.

“As our ecosystem grows, and as we see the world of work change, we see that content is now an integral part of how professionals interact not only with their jobs, but with their industries, peers and communities,” said Ms Baruch.

Research firm Marketer estimates that older LinkedIn users in the U.S. Platform entrants at least once a month will grow from 62.1 million last year to 64.7 million this year, jumping to 70.9 million by 2024.

But LinkedIn is also facing competition from scratch with new instruments, such as the Clubhouse only audio app and Upstream, which connects technology teams.

The changes to LinkedIn, bought by Microsoft Corp in 2016 for about $ 26 billion, come just months after the company revamped the platform and introduced its own type of “news” format posted by Snapchat and Instagram.

The new creator mode is likely to get more people to post on LinkedIn, say business experts who already do content for the platform.

“It democrats the process, and makes it simpler and easier for more broad people who might spend a lot of time thinking about making their products and their presence, but would like to do more,” said Dorie Clark, associate professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. Ms. Clark has 188,000 followers on LinkedIn.

Unlike many social media platforms, LinkedIn is a place where business professionals can promote themselves and their success, says Jason Lemkin, chief executive of SaaStr Inc., a business software event and content website. Mr. Lemkin has nearly 190,000 followers on LinkedIn and often posts comments on industry issues or resubmits content from SaaStr.

“What LinkedIn allows you to do – powerful – is that you can be a leader of small ideas in one place,” Mr. Lemkin said.

Another critical aspect of creator mode is the increased risk of spammy submissions, users said. LinkedIn said users could report posts they thought were spam, phishing or scams, and were investigated by the company.

LinkedIn should also provide users with a way to make money in the creator mode, said Jasmine Escalera, a career coach with nearly 5,000 followers on LinkedIn.

“I don’t think there’s a content creator who doesn’t try to make money with the content they bring out in the world,” said Ms Escalera.

LinkedIn said it was listening to its users on the matter.

“As we continue to listen to feedback from our members as we consider future opportunities, we will continue to change the way we make the most of our creators,” said Ms Baruch.

This article was published from a wire agency feed without text editing.

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