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Facebook is developing wrist straps that work with AR glass

Facebook has updated its new unpopular user interface that we see, based on the technology developed by CTRL-Labs, starting with its acquisition in 2019. A new video produced by Facebook shows wrist bands using EMG (electromyography) to turn subtle neural signals into actions.

This includes actions such as typing, swiping, playing games or a bow simulator. The wrist straps control all of this, and also have a haptic response, allowing users to ‘feel’ their actions, which are now more responsive than simple hand-tracking. Watch the video below

Detailed blog posts created by Facebook Reality Labs provided more details about the new wristbands. Bands can track basic ‘clicks’ that touch your thumb and index finger together. The hand strap will follow the sensors of your nerves with your arms, instead of the visible sensor.

While the first technology has been developed for all these years by CTRL-Labs, Facebook seeks to take the opportunities of EMG wristbands to the next level by integrating them with a daily computer.

Facebook said this time it has been using a variety of methods that offer different types of haptic response. One of these is the ‘Yellowband’, which has eight winds around each wrist, blowing/lowering to produce different emotions. ‘Tasbi’, on the other hand, uses vibrating actuators and a pressure method to transfer signals to you.

Not reading your mind

Mark Zuckerberg recently criticized the neural implant, suggesting that people should not turn their heads (equally neural transmitter) in order to use real or additional reality. Therefore, Facebook technology will use devices like the EMG band to collect data from your arms in a less neutral way, unlike Elon Musk’s Neuralink.

However, the bands will still collect a lot of data. While Facebook has a neuroethics system to test the privacy, safety and security of such technologies, people will still have to trust that there is a lot of data based on how their body moves are collected.

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